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Daily beer thefts from garage lead to charges against neighbour

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Beer cans

Ontario Provincial Police have made an arrest in a series of beer thefts in Grey County.

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Nunnsey
2 days ago
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#canada
Toronto
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Toronto is finally filling the gap on its waterfront

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Cyclists and pedestrians will soon be able to travel along the shores of Lake Ontario, from one end of Toronto to the other, without ever coming into contact with motor vehicles.

That's right — no more competing for space with trucks between Cherry Beach and the Leslie Street Spit.

Toronto is finally filling in the only remaining gap in its beloved Martin Goodman Trail, a multi-use recreational path that spans all the way from Humber Bay Arch Bridge in the west to Rouge River in the east.

Martin Goodman Trail

The new trail link will be located along the south side of Unwin Avenue, north of Tommy Thompson Park, in an area known as the Baselands. Image via City of Toronto.

"Once the missing link is completed, it will move trail users off a dangerous road full of large trucks and onto a beautiful and safe passage," said Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher during a press conference this weekend.

"The Martin Goodman Trail connects people to vibrant neighbourhoods and parks along our city’s waterfront," said Mayor John Tory similarly. "This construction will complete the trail giving pedestrians and cyclists a safe option to access our waterfront."

The project has been dubbed the "Unwin Avenue Connection" and is scheduled to be completed by this fall. Construction will begin in mid-July.

A barrier fence will be installed along the entire length of the trail to maintain Tommy Thompsons Park's dog-free status, according to the City, and "eco-passages" will be spaced every 20 metres to allow for the natural movement of wildlife.

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Nunnsey
7 days ago
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How do you get from Ashbridges to the Rouge without cars?? Typo?
Toronto
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The Diary of a Settler of Catan

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March 3

Yesterday, after three fortnights at sea, we made landfall in Catan. Here we will make our new lives. Upon stepping off the boat we fell to our knees and thanked God for providing us safe passage to this glorious land.

Catan is a lush, beautiful landscape teeming with natural resources. Well, maybe not teeming. It has five natural resources. There are sweeping forests, towering mountains, fields of wheat, and fields of sheep. Also, fields of big piles of bricks. Where did the bricks come from? Catan is a land of mystery.

March 7

We have picked a spot to make our settlement. Unfortunately, some of the good spots were already taken by other groups of settlers. I suggested joining with them in order to increase all of our chances of survival, but that idea was swiftly struck down by our leader, Captain Revis.

“We came to Catan to be free. We will be beholden to no other man,” the captain said, rallying our spirits as only he can. “We will build our own settlement, and it will be the best settlement in all of Catan.” Everyone cheered.

The spot we chose is bordered on two sides by forest and on the third by one of those huge brick piles. The landscape here shifts abruptly. One moment you are walking through dense foliage and then, suddenly: bricks. It takes some getting used to.

March 9

A note on the sheep: it appears that they are the only animal in all of Catan. Strange. I cannot help but slightly mistrust this place.

March 29

Our location does not allow us access to any wheat or sheep, and as a result, we are very hungry. Weeks ago I tried to raise this issue but Captain Revis quickly changed the subject.

“Food can come later,” he shouted. “First, we build a road. We will have the longest road in all of Catan!”

This proclamation spurred everyone into a frenzy. Now, the whole settlement speaks of nothing but the road, which remains the only thing we have worked on since we came here. No one has houses. We all sleep on the road. I am not sure how much longer I can go on like this.

May 5

I have been trying to talk some sense into my fellow settlers, the gist of my argument being: it’s not too late to move the settlement closer to a wheat field. As a result, everyone now refers to me as “Wheat Boy.” They chant these words at me as they see me approaching, which I believe undermines the degree to which I am taken seriously.

June 12

Wonderful news! Captain Revis has decided that we should build another settlement and this one is right next to two wheat fields. Finally, we’ll be able to have some real food.

June 18

Well, I spoke too soon. Turns out we’re not allowed to eat the wheat. We have to save it for potential trading. Captain Revis has gotten everyone all excited about the possibility of trading wheat for ore. Curse him and his stupid lantern jaw, lustrous beard, and commanding speaking voice. I should have shoved him overboard when I had the chance.

July 23

For reasons that are entirely unclear to me, we have begun construction on an institute of higher learning called the “University of Catan.” This despite the fact that we have no institutes of lower learning and the mud-covered, illiterate, starving children of the settlement run rampant up and down the road, pelting us with stones as we work. The entire rationale behind the University, as far as I can tell, is: “no one else has one.”

This is only the latest in a long line of catastrophic decisions. Most recently, we began building a second road and then, upon learning that it would have to intersect with another settlement’s road, abandoned the project entirely. Everyone seems to think it’s impossible for two roads to cross.

Also, it’s weird that we keep treating the bricks like something that must be harvested intermittently. They’re bricks. It’s not like they’re going anywhere.

August 7

I have decided to decamp for another settlement. My great hope is to find a like-minded group who are content to live simply off the land, who do not measure everything they do against the accomplishments of other settlements, and who do not have to subsist on a paste made from ground bricks and mud. I believe such people are out there, somewhere.

August 30

After days of wandering, I arrived at another settlement, where I was welcomed warmly. The settlement is rich in sheep, I was informed. My spirits soared.

Unfortunately, my happiness was short-lived, as I was then informed that the sheep are not to be touched. The settlers are trying to collect enough sheep to build a city. A city made out of sheep, I guess.

I have had enough. I am leaving Catan entirely. There is something about this place that brings out the competitiveness in people and makes them behave irrationally. Besides, I’ve heard tell of a new land. A land made entirely out of candy. A Candyland. And apparently, everything is a whole lot simpler there.

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Nunnsey
18 days ago
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"A note on the sheep: it appears that they are the only animal in all of Catan. Strange. I cannot help but slightly mistrust this place."
Toronto
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Dolores O'Riordan, Cranberries singer, dead at 46

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Ireland People Dolores O

Dolores O'Riordan of Irish band The Cranberries has died aged 46, according to a publicist for the singer.

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Nunnsey
126 days ago
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Toronto
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Beck Taxi against Lyft in Canada due to Uber sexual assault allegations

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Beck Taxi Kristine Hubbard

American transportation network company Lyft announced on November 13th that it will expand to Canada by the end of 2017. Lyft will first service Toronto and Hamilton, marking the company’s first foray outside of the U.S.

Publicly, Uber, Lyft’s main U.S. competitor that has been in Canada since September 2014, has said it has no problem with the company making its way north. “At Uber, we welcome competition that encourages the use of more transportation alternatives,” Uber Canada told CityNews in a statement. “More options can help reduce congestion and pollution as consumers increasingly make the shift from driving their own car to using shared mobility services.”

Beck Taxi, however, hasn’t been as open to Lyft’s Canadian expansion.

Kristine Hubbard, Beck Taxi operations manager, told 680 News‘ Richard Southern that she’s concerned for Lyft coming to Canada due to a similar company like Uber having been in the middle of in multiple sexual harassment investigations. “I look at this from the perspective not just from the taxi industry, but very much as a resident of the city who’s raising kids here,” Hubbard said. “My problem is that we’ve had eight sexual assault allegations against Uber drivers — these are the ones we know about. This is also to do with drivers who pretend they are Uber drivers.”

In response, Southern asked, “So there’s never been a sexual assault involving Beck’s or another [company’s] driver?”

“I never said that there hasn’t been,” Hubbard replied, “but I do think that [Uber] has increased the chance of that happening.”

It’s currently unclear how Lyft’s Canadian rates will compare to Uber’s, although spokesperson Daniel Moulton told MobileSyrup that it will provide a “new affordable transportation option.” Moreover, Lyft said it will offer a 25 percent bonus for the first 3,000 drivers who are approved and who complete 20 rides a week during the company’s first three months of operation in Toronto.

Image credit: Beck Taxi

Source: 680 News

The post Beck Taxi against Lyft in Canada due to Uber sexual assault allegations appeared first on MobileSyrup.

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Nunnsey
188 days ago
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Today in nonsense arguments from outpaced industries...
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My journey to minimalism

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2017 has been the start of a new chapter. I left a full-time job to work part-time, I completed a bucket list item, I started eating a primarily plant-based diet and now, I am focusing on creating a minimalism lifestyle. So much of my life has been filled with stress, worry and depression. Whether it was trying to pay off my considerable amount of consumer debt or coping with the loss of my dad, there have been some pretty major obstacles to overcome. Now, with this new chapter, I am trying to live a more intention-filled life. And this starts with minimalism.

One thing I’ve realized since starting this journey; holy shit, we have a lot of stuff. Much of it we rarely use, but hold on to it because we believe we one day may use it. When I was at home during the winter, decided to do a massive de-clutter of our home. 28 bags to good will later, I realized I have barely scratched the surface. I didn’t even get to the basement, which I know would be another 28 bags worth of stuff. It feels SO good to de-clutter your home! Don’t you feel amazing after? Like a physical weight has been lifted off from your shoulders. However, these purges also reveal your spending habits and how much money we waste on stuff. I noticed this, especially this year, my tide to emotional spending and how much stuff I have accumulated over the years.

We hold on to stuff for nostalgia and ‘motivation’. I had an entire closet full of pre-pregnancy clothes (mama’s out there can relate) that I was keeping because they were my nice work clothes and I was hoping I could fit back into them. Nature has other plans and my post-baby body isn’t changing (my hips are naturally wider and my boobs more saggy – thanks breastfeeding!) after I got ride of these and did a capsule wardrobe, I noticed my attitude towards clothes changes for the better. Now, when I put on clothes, they all fit and I feel confident in them.

It is harder to let go of the nostalgia. Minimalism blogs recommend taking a photo in place of the physical object, but I have a hard time doing that. Do I really need my second grade report card? Or a high school ISU? No, but for some reason I have a hard time letting this stuff go. I’m sure there is a psychological connection here.

All of these lessons learned have led me down the path to minimalism. When people think of minimalism, they probably thing barren rooms, with no personal items and a stale wardrobe. It’s in fact, the opposite. I see minimalism as a life movement to help you distinguish what you value in life. Once you realize these values, it helps you prioritize what is important and how you should spend your money and time. As you read in my previous post, my initial minimalism focus was on my clothes. I love shopping, but shopping doesn’t necessarily love me back. Now that I am curating my capsule wardrobe, a lot of this stress has been lifted. I wanted to transfer this into other areas of my life.

What have I learned that I value? Nothing beats a family night at home. I love being with them, so this means investing in things to help this. We love to cook together, so investing in quality produce and cook ware so we can spend time making a meal. We love going on family walks, so this means investing in good shoes and comfortable athleisure so we can enjoy being active together. Personally, my focus on my health has become a huge priority. This means investing in a running coach, yoga classes and healthy food. Once I’ve prioritized what I value, it is easier to get financial distractions out of the way. I know what I’d rather invest in (time with family, fitness, travel) and not invest in(emotional shopping and drinking). Minimalism, for me, also means re-evaluating what enters into your home. Do I really need 20 necklaces? Or random kitchen items? Once you get rid of these unnecessary things, you’re able to make room for what matters.

Obviously, nothing is perfect and there are definitely somethings I need to be mindful of. I need to continue setting intentions on my spending habits. I need to keep re-visiting my personal and family goals to realize what is important. We do need to be aware and monitor what enters our home, to ensure we don’t replace the old stuff with new stuff. I am making a list for my fall/winter purge items and you can bet that basement is on there.  I also want to continue with building a capsule wardrobe. I love this! I would have thought having a small amount of clothes would be boring, but its not at all. I’ve never felt more confident in my wardrobe and I believe this shows in how I carry myself. We also need to monitor how much stuff Emily accumulates. Obviously, this isn’t her fault, however, Tolga and I need to be diligent that our house doesn’t get overrun with clothes and toys that she barely uses. I purged a bunch of her stuff and she hasn’t even noticed. She still has plenty of stuff to play with, but its all things that are her favorites and being value to her play time.

There is a lot online about the minimalism movement. Want to learn more yourself? Here are some blogs I read (thanks to those who messaged on Facebook about this!) when I got started:

  1. http://www.theminimalists.com/
  2. https://bemorewithless.com/
  3. https://www.becomingminimalist.com/simple-living-blogs/

 

I believe this is now my new lifestyle. I have learned what I value and vote with my dollars. I see what I need to invest in and what can be ignored. I found my stress and mental health have been more even-keeled and I am not overwhelmed by our ‘stuff’. I still have a lot to learn and de-clutter, but I am getting there. I am looking forward to teaching Emily about how to live a life that matters and fill it with things that are important and not temporary place holders. Minimalism also being a new financial freedom I haven’t felt before. I don’t feel pressure to buy things on sale because those items don’t bring value to my life. It is also a great conversation topic at a dinner party! Want to learn more? Don’t be afraid to reach out and let’s chat!

Photo by Bench Accounting on Unsplash

 






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Nunnsey
227 days ago
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Toronto
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